A Case for Rebranding the Older Worker

A case for rebranding the older worker

Originally published on CampaignLive.com.

The industry doesn’t seem to have room for many over 40. But once we reach that milestone, invisible can’t be the new normal.

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Corporate Branding Digest, Jan. 14, 2015


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As we start a new year, many of us are turning to our goals, from losing weight to reconnecting with long-lost friends. I enjoy motivational goals but appreciate an action plan to make them come to life. If building up your reputation and enhancing your personal brand are on your to-do list for 2015, this monthly strategy will help you stay focused.


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“Adversity is the trial of principle. Without it, a man hardly knows whether he is honest or not.” —Henry Fielding